Stop Procrasting!

Procrastination can be a big hinderance when attempting to be productive. All of us do it, in some form or fashion and some are much better at it than others. What exactly is procrastination? At its very foundation, it is poor impulse control. It is choosing what we want to do over what we need to do. Here is why we get caught in procrastination – we assume that when we decide we need to do something that we will always be that person that has resolutely decided to do that specific task, project, or goal. But we won’t always be that person. Let me explain. Last week, I decided I am finally going to get my next book written. It has been an idea brewing in my head for well over a year now. So I set a goal of writing for 30 minutes a day to get it started. However, on the day that I sat down to start working on this goal, I’m not the same person who made the goal – I’m a little tired from a fun weekend with the hubby and I’d really like to repaint a room upstairs and rearrange the furniture in my living room – tasks that don’t require actual thinking. This is where we get ourselves into trouble. As David McRaney so aptly stated in his book, You Are Not So Smart, “The trick is to accept that the now-you will not be the person facing those choices, it will be the future-you – a person who can’t be trusted.” In the example above, the now-me is not the past-me that made this commitment to write every day. However, because I have worked very hard these past few years on my self-awareness I know that I need to have a plan in place to make sure that I do what I committed to accomplish. So not only have I added it as a quarterly goal, I’ve also added it to my to do list (which I am obsessive about), I’ve told my accountability partner that I am going to do it and I’ve also told my coach I’m going to do it. So I’ve essentially set up four supporting mechanisms to make sure that I write every single day for 30 minutes. No matter how much I don’t feel like writing, the thought of not meeting a goal, not crossing something off my to do list, and then having to report that failure to two different people makes me at least want to get the task out of the way for the day so I can go do the “want” items.

Superachievers get things done – not because they have more will power than most, but because they understand that they will not be the same person each and every day. Instead, they are self-aware and know just how much their brains can hinder them and they have a plan put in place for their really important tasks and goals to ensure that they tackle them. This is why the ME² System for Super Productivity is so helpful. It allows you to become more aware of your energy and how it affects your achievement efforts. The lower your energy, the more apt you are to forego what needs to get done. So you plan your important tasks for those times you have high energy and you plan your days and weeks around maximizing that high energy. Wondering what the ME² System for Super Productivity is? Stay tuned… it will be out soon as I’ve been writing it for 30 minutes a day.